Xbox One Reputation System explained

OXM got the scoop on the new Xbox One Reputation System and it definitely has more implications for the user than anything the Xbox 360 put in place.

Rather than the standard 5-star rating system, player behaviour will be tracked. Microsoft’s aim is that you won’t ever need to mute an annoying player or ignore them because they’re frustrating you. Xbox Live is hoping to be a system considerate of the user as opposed to just matchmaking you with anyone.

Microsoft’s Senior Product Manager, Mike Lavin explains…

“If people are in your friends list, we’re not touching that, we’re just making it easier for you to come together. It’s really the anonymous side of things where we’re making these investments. Ultimately if there’s a few per cent of our population that are causing the rest of the population to have a miserable time, we should be able to identify those folks.”

“If we see consistently that people, for instance, don’t like playing with you, that you’re consistently blocked, that you’re the subject of enforcement actions because you’re sending naked pictures of yourself to people that don’t want naked pictures of you… Blatant things like that have the ability to quickly reduce your Reputation score.

“You’ll start to see some effects if you continue to play bad or harass other people en masse. You’ll probably end up starting to play more with other people that are more similar to you.”

It also seems as if players that have a good reputation may get a reward of some sort?

“Reputation is just like Achievements – you want your Reputation score as high as you can get it. There may even be opportunities where if you participate in some of our community programmes, your reputation can even get higher.”

Sounds interesting. More as we get it.

(Source: OXM)

About the author

Ray Willmott

Ray is the founder and editor of Expansive. He is also a former Community Manager for Steel Media, and has written for a variety of gaming websites over the years. His work can be seen on Pocket Gamer, PG.biz, Gfinity, and the Red Bull Gaming Column. He has also written for VG247, Videogamer, GamesTM, PLAY, and MyM Magazine,